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New General Manager at Power Authority's Frederick R. Clark Energy Center in Marcy

Contact:
Michael Saltzman
914-390-8181
michael.saltzman@nypa.gov

August 15, 2006

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE 

MARCY—The New York Power Authority (NYPA) has promoted Thomas J. Shust to general manager of its Frederick R. Clark Energy Center, which directs and monitors NYPA’s statewide generating and transmission operations.

“Tom’s diverse experiences over a 27-year Power Authority career give him the necessary credentials for his expanded managerial responsibilities as general manager, Clark Energy Center [CEC],” said Steven J. DeCarlo, NYPA senior vice president, Transmission. “The high standards Tom has brought to whatever job he is working on have been a great asset and are sure to continue in his latest role.”

Shust was promoted from Clark’s superintendent of maintenance, a position he had held since November 2002, before being named general manager earlier this month. In addition to his previous managerial responsibilities for the CEC’s Test, Electrical and Mechanical departments, he has assumed the responsibilities of overseeing the energy center’s Maintenance Resource Management (MRM) department, along with its security, safety, and environmental functions.”

“These work disciplines involve critical everyday tasks that support the effectiveness of the Clark Energy Center, and the role it plays in dispatching economical power throughout the state,” said Shust. “I know how important the planning aspects are to my new job, considering the competitive changes in our industry that require quick decision-making for various situations. Thankfully, we have a team of dedicated and talented professionals at Clark that facilitate the efficient and skillful handling of various circumstances that arise.”

Besides coordinating NYPA’s statewide operations, the Clark Energy Center provides information to the New York Independent System Operator, which oversees the statewide market for sale and purchase of electricity.

Shust, 51, joined the Power Authority in 1979 as an entry-level technician at its Blenheim-Gilboa Pumped-Storage Project in the northern Catskills. He later held various other positions of increasing responsibility at B-G and Clark, including test engineer, technical services superintendent, and MRM superintendent.

The job duties Shust has performed over the years correspond with the role NYPA plays as a statewide public power organization, providing electricity and energy services both upstate and downstate. For example, he provided technical advice and support during the Power Authority’s construction of seven small, clean natural gas power plants in New York City in 2001, when he was assigned to the city during a pivotal five-month construction period, immediately before the plants’ start-up for the peak-demand summer season.

 “Some have described Tom’s efforts during that period as exceptional since he continued to make himself available to his staff at Clark, in addition to his dedicated work in supporting the Power Authority’s full-fledged effort in getting the new plants into commercial operation before the spike in power demand in New York City that summer,” said DeCarlo.

Shust earned a bachelor’s degree in electrical technology from the State University of New York (SUNY) Institute of Technology in 1981, a master’s degree in management science from SUNY Binghamton in 1988, and a master’s degree in business administration from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute in Troy in 1990.

Tom and his wife Mary Beth live in the Town of Cazenovia, in Madison County, with their daughter Kathleen.

About NYPA:

■    NYPA uses no tax money or state credit.  It finances its operations through the sale of bonds and revenues earned in large part through sales of electricity.  ■    NYPA is a leader in promoting energy-efficiency, new energy technologies and electric transportation initiatives.  ■    It is the nation’s largest state-owned electric utility, with 18 generating facilities in various parts of the state and more than 1,400 circuit-miles of transmission lines.

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